SURF THE WEB SAFER NOW…

DON’T GO ONLINE ALONE ANYMORE…IT JUST IS NOT SAFE OUT THERE.

surf websites safely now

NOW YOU CAN SURF WEBSITES SAFELY WITHOUT THE DREAD!

This new technology is called: WEB OF TRUST…Download a simple app with Google Chrome or Mozilla FireFox web browsers and your worry about website safety is over. This includes hyperlinks within emails where you are TOLD not to CLICK. Now you can peek at the links before you click and you are also guided by a traffic light warning system.

WOT protects YOU from phishing scams, SPAM, and other Internet scams online. This is a must have app (software application connected to your web browser).

BROWSERS COVERED WITH WOT:
browsers covered by WOTYes all operating systems work with WOT: Windows Xp and later, Mac, and Linux. What more can you ask for?

In fact, the New York Times includes this program in their recent

New York Times:

Five Ways to Keep Online Criminals at Bay

“Google says its automated scans of the Internet recently turned up malware on roughly 300,000 Web sites, double the number it recorded two years ago. Each site can contain many infected pages. Meanwhile, Malware doubled last year, to 240 million unique attacks, according to Symantec, a maker of security software. And that does not count the scourge of fake antivirus software and other scams. So it is more important than ever to protect yourself. Here are some basic tips for thwarting them.”

The New York Times article goes on to state that “Free tools like McAfee’s SiteAdvisor and the Firefox [also other browsers mentioned above] add-on Web of Trust can also help — warning about potentially dangerous links.”

I personally use this program with Google Chrome and FireFox and have found it an excellent buddy to have looking over your online shoulder. You can never be too safe online and programs such as WOT are a must have these days.

WOT…”Web of Trust” – http://www.mywot.com/

“The technician set up my laptop, now what do I do?”

NOTE: THIS ARTICLE CAN BE REPRODUCED

BY GIVING ACKNOWLEDGMENT TO THE AUTHOR.

“The technician set up my laptop, now what do I do?”

By Gregory Westdionsaur and kid in costume

Ah, the wonderment of getting a new computer. No more having to watch others show off their computer skills as they demonstrate their new digital slide show, or listen about how they talk with relatives across three oceans for hours at no cost. With your new computer you are ready to join the online communities around the globe.

Three gigabytes of random access memory, five hundred gigs of hard drive, a one year subscription to some antivirus / malware protection software utility and you are “good to go,” says the clerk in the computer store.

“But does it come with a manual,” you ask?

“The manual is in the OS software,” the clerk says as he gets you to sign his copy of the credit card slip. “Have a nice day,” he hollers as you lug computer through the doors towards home.

“Ya right,” you mutter under your breath.

So many choices, too many decisions, but at least you finally got it home. Once you open the lid and go to turn on the new computer you realize that you have no idea what you are doing. In fact, you don’t know a gigabyte from a Tyrannosaurus Rex, and you couldn’t care less. All you want is to on the Internet and check your email, surf some websites and maybe learn how to get those 265 photos from your digital camera.

“So now what,” you say aloud to yourself? “Where do I begin, you ask your dog in desperation as she gives you that puzzled look?

There is an easy way to learn the various computer functions you need to catch up with your computer geek of a neighbour. First, you can take a formal course at your local college. These courses usually range from beginner to advanced. You can also take online courses (courses offered over the Internet), but this takes a special skill, as many people are not used to working alone and need to get out into a classroom setup with real humans. You can also join a local computer group. Here you will find people with similar interests who provide various seminars on tech-related issues.

I have been on a computer since 1972 where an IBM System/360 Operating System was the popular system in data processing centres. Over the years I have received computer training from all methods mentioned about. In fact, today I am taking two computer courses from books that came with DVD training programs.

However, if you simply need to know one certain function on the computer, learn a software program, or how to troubleshoot a problem in your computer, I suggest Google’s YouTube videos. Computer instructors, tech companies, libraries, schools and many knowledgable individuals upload training videos to YouTube. Here you not only get free training, but targeted training. For instance, if you need to know how to install a USB flash drive in Windows 7, you simply go to youtube.com on the Internet and there will be many videos to help you through this process.

One tip for searching within YouTube for help, try using the term: “tutorials” with your search. Sometimes this will give you a full training course on the particular subject you are interested in learning. I use YouTube all the time when I need help with a particular computer program. But it doesn’t stop there either. I wanted to learn how to winterize my RV and save the hundred dollar fee, so I searched for videos on YouTube and have winterized my own trailer ever since for only the cost of antifreeze.

You can get free training from the best of both worlds. If you are new to the computer, YouTube videos will help you get an idea what you are up against, but what if you still need the help of a human. Central United Church operates a free computer drop-in training centre where you can get free help on any computer-related issue. Since September 2010 over two-hundred people have found this training centre an excellent way to learn at one’s own speed. The only cost is a food item to donate to the Food Bank. For more info: go to the website ( http://central-united-church.org/training ) or phone: 519 344-4561.

[bi-line]

Gregory West is a Mac Instructor for Lambton College.
He is also Webmaster at Central United Church, the home of Sarnia’s new
Community Computer Training Centre at: http://goo.gl/76H15.
This is free and open to the public as a community service.

Learn at your own speed.

Gregory can be reached at: prospector16(at)gmail.com

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 5,400 times in 2010. That’s about 13 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 76 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 267 posts. There were 113 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 6mb. That’s about 2 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was May 12th with 84 views. The most popular post that day was A Windows 7 moment….

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were ifreestores.com, reddit.com, en.wordpress.com, central-united-church.org, and facebook.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for free computer images, ausable river ontario, computer internet, internet computer, and google chrome video problem.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

A Windows 7 moment… May 2010

2

Free Computer and Internet Lessons September 2009

3

Google Chrome Help – VIDEO PROBLEM SOLVED August 2010

4

Fall LineUp for FREE Computer Training Seminars July 2009

5

Canoe the Ausable River, Ontario August 2006
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