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80% of Canadians Aged 16 and Older Use The Internet

You are not alone in Cyberspace anymore…
In fact, the number of Canadians using the Internet has risen 73% since 2007, according to a 2009 Stats Canada report. That means 21.7 million Canadians navigated the web for “personal” reasons. You probably agree  that those stats would be much higher if they include kids using the Internet.
ARE YOU A TYPICAL USER?
The TV has a huge battle with Internet users. The report shows: “Most (96%) Internet users aged 16 or older reported going online from home during 2009, while 42% said they used it from work, 21% from schools and 15% from libraries.
Those who use the Internet at home counted for “75% [who] went online every day during a typical month, up from 68% in 2007. In 2009, 55% were online for five hours or more during a typical week, up from 49% in 2007.”
EMAIL STILL NO ONE
Not surprising, email (93%) is still the number one program used online, although many more people are now searching health issues online, an increase use of 59%. Here are some more usage stats:
General browsing for fun or leisure       78%
Obtain weather or road conditions        75%
Education, training or school work       50%
View news or sports                                    68%
Make telephone calls                                  14%
Full Stats Canada Survey: http://bit.ly/statscan
PEOPLE STILL HARBOUR FEARS IN CYBERSPACE
Are you afraid to use your credit card or do your banking online? Apparently, the more experience people are with the Internet, “the less they worried about security issues. It revealed that Internet users with “less than five years, 55% were very concerned about online credit card use and 50% about banking over the Internet.
These proportions dropped to 42% and 37%, respectively, for those reporting five or more years of Internet use.” Not bad considering there was a large segment of the population who arrived late on the Internet scene.
Social Networking sites such as Facebook increase the popularity of the Internet. If many of your friends, neighbours, and relatives use Facebook…Chances are, so will you. Baby Boomers are extremely attracted to Social Networking, finding old friends,
keeping up with current ones and also family members. Oh yes, let us not forget those who seek for mates…Online Dating is huge, sorry but that is for another survey 😉
Gregory West is a Mac Instructor for Lambton College. 
He is also Webmaster at Central United Church, the home of Sarnia’s new 
COMMUNITY Tech School at: http://central-united-church.org/news Gregory can be reached at: prospector16@gmail.com

Leopard OS X – A Review & Preview

Missing Manual Leopard OS X

A Must Have

Mac OS X Leopard

The Missing Manual

by David Pogue
Published by O’Reilly Media Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-0-596-52952-9
Pages: 893
USA: $34.99 / CDA: $34.99
missingmanuals.com

If you love your Mac, you will love this book. This book details every aspect of the Leopard operating system, from simple to advanced. Looking up how to do something is fast and easy, although this book is a real treat for simply browsing topics to learn some tricks and tips that you won’t find in most other Help sections.

For instance, only about 4% of us back up our computers and now there is no excuse. Leopard comes equipped with its own backup system, Time Machine, and with this book you can easily follow the simple step-by-step process to ensure you never lose anything again. When working through these types of sections you can easily set up the process, read the technical stuff, or try out some of the exciting tips that are all highlighted: basic, moderate, and advanced data. But the bottom line is all these sections are designed to get you going, give you the “under-the-hood” scoops, and show you some magic tricks to boot that helps make this book a good read.

Apple created 300 new features inside Leopard, however they failed to let you in on many of the tricks and tips that “demystifies” this amazing new operating system. In this book David Pogue also shows “refugees”, who escaped Windows and moved to a Mac. Windows users need no other books, as Pogue shows where they went in Mac OS X 10.5.

This book is spread out in six parts: The Mac OS X Desktop, Programs in Mac OS X, The Components of Mac OS X, The Technologies of Mac OS X, Mac OS Online, Appendices.

In the first part you discover folders and windows and how to organize your data. Pogue takes you through the various items such as: Spotlight searching, using the Dock, Desktop and Toolbars and gives you an expert feel as you see how simple Leopard is to use.

Without a doubt, this book is a great refresher; it is one that you will refer to when you you’re stuck. The thing I really like about this book is that you can pick it up and open it anywhere and begin reading.  I highly recommend this book for all level of users, both as a learning tool, and as a quick reference guide. Before you call a technician for a problem, treat yourself to this “must have” book first.

GET A SNEAK PEEK PREVIEW OF THIS BOOK –  CLICK HERE

Review Written by Gregory West – Member of COMP & APCUG